Haiku Experiments

Japanese painting

 

As a Flash Fiction Challenge from Dan Alatorre (Click here to see his original post), I am supposed to write a Haiku about a randomly generated topic – mine was ‘What you shouldn’t say at a funeral’

Faux Pas

‘He was my father.’

‘He was my father as well.’

‘Who the hell are you?’

 

I’m going to try some different ones.

 

Dogs

Dogs like to ‘kiss’ you

Around your face, nose and mouth

After licking bum!

 

My dog had a limp

She had hydrotherapy

She pooed in the pool

 

Lemonade was spilled

I dipped finger and tasted

Gah! It was dog drool!

 

Image in Public domain

Indirect Discourse in Third-Person Limited POV

Very good article, thanks!

Beyond the Precipice

What is indirect discourse?

Indirect discourse is “a combination of a character’s thoughts and the author’s words. In the case of indirect discourse, you don’t need italics.”

The above words were written in an e-mail to me by Mark Spencer, Dean of the School of Arts and Humanities at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. Professor Spencer teaches in UAM’s MFA program in creative writing. His fiction and non-fiction works have received numerous awards.

Indirect discourse is third-person POV, but more intimate

I briefly defined the types of POV (points of view) in my earlier article N is for Narrator.

Indirect discourse is a form of third-person limited narration that moves in and out of a character’s mind.

It has the advantage of bringing the reader into the character’s (protagonist’s) head without the use of first-person POV. This technique provides information about what the protagonist thinks or knows…

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Book Review: The Phantom Tree

Here is my review:

Reviews > The Phantom Tree

The Phantom Tree by Nicola Cornick
By Joanne Larner
Five stars

Bookshelves: historical, fantasy, spiritual-psychic

 

I love ‘time slip’ or time travel books and so I downloaded this when it was recommended to me,even though it isn’t the time period I usually read about. However, it kept me interested all the way through and surprised me at times as well. The story moves backwards and forwards from the late 16th century to the 21st century and different secrets and aspects are revealed as you read. I loved the portrayal of the different characters – most of them are very three dimensional and individual, as well as the complications of the main protagonist in forming relationships with others while living in the future. The atmosphere of the Tudor time is vividly brought to life and the story is intriguing. I thoroughly recommend it to anyone who likes history or time travel novels.

Rose’s Playlist (13) – Witches’ Brew by Janie Jones

Rose experiments with Wicca, helped by her friend, Frances, who is a devotee. She finds she enjoys the relaxing meditation she experiences in a Wicca house in Canewdon, Essex, even though she knows Richard would not approve of ‘witchcraft’. That is why I chose the title ‘Witches’ Brew’ by Janie Jones  (click link to see video) for this song. It is a sixties one hit wonder, which I loved when I was a child.

Pic of a witch on a flying broomstck

Witch on a broomstick

You may download the ‘Richard Liveth Yet’ trilogy or buy a print version by clicking here

 

 

 

 

 Image credit: Public Domain lakeside acquired from OCAL (Website)

Rose’s Playlist (12) – Too Bad by Nickelback

Rose has a psychic reading from each of the other members of her friend, Lynne’s, circle. She can understand some of what is said, but not all of it. She leaves not much the wiser, but a conversation at the end gives her a new idea…

I chose the song ‘Too Bad’ by Nickelback (click the link to watch video) for this scene, because Richard would have considered this witchcraft and thence a sin, but also because it was too bad that Rose didn’t really get much out of the session.

Photo of Nickelback in concert

Nickelback in concert

You can read the details of Rose’s adventures by clicking here to download a Kindle copy or order a print version of the ‘Richard Liveth Yet’ books.

 

 

 

 

Image credit: By Stuart Sevastos (Nickelback @ Perth Arena (17/11/2012)) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Difficulties of Dialogue

I think I do most of these, although I do love my adverbs – and exclamation marks!! But then, I am quite an excitable person! 😉

A Writer's Path

by Teagan Berry

Every writer has something that they struggle with. It’s just natural for this to happen – we’re not perfect. For some, it might be descriptive abilities they lack. For others, character development might be their weak link. But what I’ve noticed tends to be the most common foible among writers, is their ability to write convincing dialogue.

For some reason, dialogue has never really been a big issue for me. Instead, I have an ongoing problem with character descriptions. But for those writers that dialogue doesn’t come naturally to, I have some tips and suggestions which will hopefully help.

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