5 Tips to Make You a Better Writer Instantly

Good advice!

A Writer's Path

by Felicity Annora

Hey guys! I’m back again with my self-help posts, and this time I’m going to tell you you how to become a better writer instantly. I know it sounds like one of those bad “get-rich-quick” gimmicks that you find in commercials- and you’d absolutely right. But this time, the tips and tricks are real and they truly are things that help you improve  your writing quickly.

So without further ado, here they are:

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Writing Past a Problem

Very true!

A Writer's Path

by Lev Raphael

Working on my most recently published book, I ran into a significant problem.  To move the novel forward, I needed my protagonist to have a confrontation with a minor character.  I knew what this woman’s role was in the book and how she drove the plot forward.

But the woman herself was a blank.  I had no idea what she looked like, what she sounded like, what kind of house she had.  None of that was real.  And so I did when I’ve learned to do after many years as an author: I let go.  Consciously, that is.

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Inciting Moment: What It Is and Why You Should Care

Good explanation

A Writer's Path

by Andrea Lundgren

Recently, I was explaining the concept of an inciting moment to my five-year-old (he’s a bit young, but one might as well start early, right?), and it got me thinking about how critical the concept is.

Some writers may call it an inciting incident, and others have probably never heard of it, including the idea without any formal title or understanding of how it works, but the inciting moment is what happens to make the world of the story change. One of the many rocks dropped in the story-pond that set off a series of ripples. It’s the spark that jolts the story to life.

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Indirect Discourse in Third-Person Limited POV

Very good article, thanks!

Beyond the Precipice

What is indirect discourse?

Indirect discourse is “a combination of a character’s thoughts and the author’s words. In the case of indirect discourse, you don’t need italics.”

The above words were written in an e-mail to me by Mark Spencer, Dean of the School of Arts and Humanities at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. Professor Spencer teaches in UAM’s MFA program in creative writing. His fiction and non-fiction works have received numerous awards.

Indirect discourse is third-person POV, but more intimate

I briefly defined the types of POV (points of view) in my earlier article N is for Narrator.

Indirect discourse is a form of third-person limited narration that moves in and out of a character’s mind.

It has the advantage of bringing the reader into the character’s (protagonist’s) head without the use of first-person POV. This technique provides information about what the protagonist thinks or knows…

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Book Review: The Phantom Tree

Here is my review:

Reviews > The Phantom Tree

The Phantom Tree by Nicola Cornick
By Joanne Larner
Five stars

Bookshelves: historical, fantasy, spiritual-psychic

 

I love ‘time slip’ or time travel books and so I downloaded this when it was recommended to me,even though it isn’t the time period I usually read about. However, it kept me interested all the way through and surprised me at times as well. The story moves backwards and forwards from the late 16th century to the 21st century and different secrets and aspects are revealed as you read. I loved the portrayal of the different characters – most of them are very three dimensional and individual, as well as the complications of the main protagonist in forming relationships with others while living in the future. The atmosphere of the Tudor time is vividly brought to life and the story is intriguing. I thoroughly recommend it to anyone who likes history or time travel novels.

The Difficulties of Dialogue

I think I do most of these, although I do love my adverbs – and exclamation marks!! But then, I am quite an excitable person! 😉

A Writer's Path

by Teagan Berry

Every writer has something that they struggle with. It’s just natural for this to happen – we’re not perfect. For some, it might be descriptive abilities they lack. For others, character development might be their weak link. But what I’ve noticed tends to be the most common foible among writers, is their ability to write convincing dialogue.

For some reason, dialogue has never really been a big issue for me. Instead, I have an ongoing problem with character descriptions. But for those writers that dialogue doesn’t come naturally to, I have some tips and suggestions which will hopefully help.

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4 Ways to Handle Backstory

I had this problem in my third book – it can be very difficult

A Writer's Path

Four 4

By Andrea Lundgren

Every story has exposition–details of the character and world that you, as the author, need to pass on to the reader. You’ve spent hours fleshing out the world of your story and learning about your characters, and now you have to find some way of getting this information (or at least the essential part) from your head to the readers’. (This is especially true in science fiction and fantasy, where you need to tell how the world of the story differs from our world.)

So what’s an author to do?

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The Bearnshaw Books by N.S. Rose – A New Ricardian Author

My review of the Bearnshaw books by Natalie Rose

murreyandblue

For those of you who enjoy reading Ricardian fiction, there is a new Ricardian author to savour. N.S. Rose (Natalie) has based her first novel, ‘Bearnshaw – Legend of the Whyte Doe’ on a Lancashire folk tale: Legend of Bearnshaw Tower/The Milk White Doe’. Born in the Peak District and raised in the Pennines, Natalie now farms beef and sheep in Yorkshire with her husband and brother-in-law. The countryside of her upbringing and subsequent move near to the unique and beautiful city of York inspired the ‘Bearnshaw’ fictional series.

Ms Rose weaves fact and fiction skilfully as she takes the reader on an exploration of the Bearnshaw family and their fortunes during the turbulent period of history now known as the Wars of the Roses and it is certainly a charming and original take on those times.

The leading protagonist of this first book is Sibyl Bearnshaw, a young woman…

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How to Be Taken Seriously as a Writer

Absolutely!

A Writer's Path

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by Kate Colby

So writing is your creative calling, your life’s purpose, your ultimate joy. Congratulations! You’re part of (in my totally unbiased opinion) one of the best groups of people in the world. You know it, I know it — and yet, your friends and family don’t.

After all, what’s so special about being a writer? Literally billions of people on the planet write every day. It’s a basic life skill, one of the first we learn. And as a career? Psh! You might as well steal a cardboard box from behind your local grocery store and get comfy on the street.

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Becoming a Writer in Your 40s, 50s, and Beyond

I’m the first kind!

A Writer's Path

hands elderly

by Lauren Sapala

Age can be a touchy topic for artists of all types. There’s a glamorous myth that says all the geniuses come into their talent at a young age, and by the time they’re 30 they have already reached astonishing heights of prowess.

But like so many other sexy tales that figure into writing mythology, this one has little basis in fact.

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